Blackcurrant and Coconut Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

Blackcurrant and Coconut Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

Blackcurrant and Cinnamon Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

 

If you’re a breakfast fan this one’s for you! In my quest to find the perfect breakfast cereal, I created this raw activated blackcurrant and coconut buckwheat granola, and I can’t wait for you to try it! The blackcurrant powder is a true revelation in this recipe, but more about that later.

If you follow Swoon Food on social media you’ll know I love my breakfast plates. I’m always looking out for new and interesting flavours and combinations to keep it fresh for myself, and hopefully give you guys lots of inspiration too! My plate usually begins with some from of nut or seed base, be it granola or basil/chia seeds. From there I’ll add coconut yoghurt and/or milk, seasonal fruit and often a sprinkle of whatever pretty super food powder I’m loving that day.

Because I eat dairy, gluten and mostly sugar free, it’s not always easy to find a ready made granola that fits the bill. There are a few about but it’s always nice to mix things up, so I started making my own granolas a few years back.

My granola recipe has evolved over time alongside my food preferences. You may remember my series of oat based granolas such as banana maple, pumpkin pie and festive Christmas. These were followed by a grain free Maple and Cinnamon Buckwheat Granola and then a completely paleo and sugar free version which is exclusive to The 10 Day Sugar Cleanse program.

 

Blackcurrant and Coconut Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

 

This new blackcurrant and coconut buckwheat granola recipe also happens to be dairy, grain and almost sugar free. It has a base of soaked, activated buckwheat. Despite it’s name, buckwheat is actually a gluten free seed. It’s also a source of protein and has a mild flavour which lends itself nicely to a breakfast cereal. The reason for soaking and activating is two fold. Buckwheat has a mucilaginous substance on it’s surface which can irritate the digestion. Soaking removes this substance and also activates the inherent enzymes in the buckwheat groat which aid the digestive process. After soaking, the buckwheat needs to be dried in order to make a granola. This has to be done at a temperature low enough so as not to kill the enzymes we’ve just activated.

This granola recipe also contains almonds, sunflower and pumpkin seeds which are also activated and dehydrated in order to remove the inhibitor substances from their skins and activate the inherent enzymes within them. This makes them easier to digest and the nutrients in them more readily available. If this is sounding all too much for you at this point, you can either skip this part or lightly toast them instead. Heat also deactivates the inhibitor substances on their skins, but the down side is it also kills the enzymes inside.

 

 

 

Blackcurrant and Cinnamon Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

 

Cinnamon, coconut and blackcurrants are the flavourings in this granola. Blackcurrants are an amazing source of antioxidants, and I read that NZ blackcurrants contain even more antioxidants than açai! So I’ve used soft dried and powdered blackcurrant which means when you add milk or yoghurt to this granola you get a pretty violet colour. Coconut, of course, has many benefits too. It’s an amazing source of lauric acid which has anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties. Cinnamon is a beautiful spice which has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and imparts a lovely sweet flavour alongside the coconut and blackcurrants.

If you want to get a bit fancy, serve your granola with coconut yoghurt, an extra sprinkle of freeze dried blackcurrants and, for special occasions, a couple of ViBERi chocolate balls! I hope you love this blackcurrant and coconut buckwheat granola recipe as much as I do, and be sure to let me know if you make it. Enjoy!

 

Now I’d love to hear from you! What’s your favourite breakfast?
Do you eat the same thing every day or do you mix it up?
Leave a comment below and let me know!

Blackcurrant and Cinnamon Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

 

Blackcurrant and Coconut Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

Makes: 1 large jar / approximately 6 cups
Prep time: 30 minutes Dehydrating time: 12- 24 hours

1 cup buckwheat groats
1 cup raw almonds
1 cup sunflower seeds
1 cup pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup whole flaxseed
1 cup coconut chips
1 cup desiccated coconut
1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
10g blackcurrant powder (I used ViBERi)
1 cup/100g soft dried blackcurrant berries (I used ViBERi)

If the idea of activating all the nuts and seeds sounds too much, simply do the buckwheat to ensure it’s easy to digest. Alternatively, you can also buy dried activated nuts and seeds from Little Bird Organics in NZ.

To soak the buckwheat place it in a bowl and cover with water. Leave at room temperature for 2 to 4 hours, then drain and wash well to remove the mucilaginous substance released. Place the almonds in a bowl, cover with water and leave to stand at room temperature for 10 to 12 hours. Do the same with the sunflower and pumpkin seeds, but soak 4 to 6 hours. When the nuts and seeds have finished soaking drain off the water and rinse thoroughly. If you don’t use them straight away they can be stored in the fridge in a sealed container for up to 3 days.

To dehydrate the buckwheat, nuts and seeds in an oven, spread them onto separate lined oven trays and place into the oven at the lowest fan bake setting (should be around 50ºC). Prop the door slightly ajar using the handle of a wooden spoon or similar, this allows air flow and should keep the temperature below 46ºC. The buckwheat will take between 6 to 8 hours and the nuts and seeds between 8 to 24 hours to dehydrate, depending on your oven. Check them often to ensure they’re not getting cooked! Alternatively, if you have a dehydrator set it at 41ºC and place the nuts and seeds on the trays to dehydrate for 36 to 48 hours depending on humidity.

When all the nuts and seeds are fully dehydrated (i.e. they’re dry all the way through and crunchy), place them in a large mixing bowl and combine with the remaining ingredients. Transfer the granola to a large, well sealed jar and store at room temperature. This granola will keep for several months.

Note: when you get the hang of activating and dehydrating it becomes very simple. Feel free to adapt this base recipe using any other nuts, seeds or spices to your liking.

Nut soak time guide:
almonds 10-12 hours
brazil nuts 8-12 hours
hazelnuts 4-6 hours
walnuts 4-6 hours
macadamia nuts 8-12 hours
pecans 4-6 hours
cashew nuts 2-4 hours
pumpkin seeds 4-6 hours
sunflower seeds 4-6 hours

Blackcurrant and Coconut Buckwheat Granola (Raw Activated)

Nutty Chocolate Truffles

Nutty Chocolate Truffles

Nutty Chocolate Truffles

 

One of my passions is creating sweet treats that taste freaking amazing AND are truly good for you. And by good for you, I mean full of protein and nutrients, ideally organic, dairy and gluten free, activated if raw, and as little or no sugar as possible.

Not always an easy task. More often than not treats which meet the “good for you” part fail miserably in taste department, and if they taste amazing it’s usually because they have some kind of sugar added.

So these nutty chocolate truffles are my latest obsession. They’re full of nut protein, they have a good serving of healthy fats from nuts and coconut oil, they deliver a good does of antioxidants from raw cacao powder and best of all they’re only sweetened with a little rice syrup.

Rice syrup is made from fermented brown rice and is completely fructose free. Fructose is the undesirable sugar that our bodies don’t have an off-switch for, meaning we don’t register when we’ve had enough. Our bodies don’t produce fructose and can’t metabolise it into energy (like they do glucose) so it’s sent to the liver which is the only organ that can metabolise it. If the liver is overloaded with fructose it’s then turned into fat and stored. Rice syrup is made up of glucose and maltose which our bodies can easily metabolise directly into useable energy. Rice syrup is quite a mild flavoured sweetener but works well with the rich chocolate flavour in these nutty chocolate truffles.

I’ve given a few options for the nuts and nut or seed butter in the recipe below because if you stick to the basic quantities you can mix and match nuts and butters to your liking. Peanut butter for example, will give you the richest chocolate truffles, almond butter creates a toasty caramel flavour, and tahini a slightly savoury flavour.

As always this recipe is super easy to whip up, simply throw all the ingredients into a food processor, blend, roll into balls and coat in your choice of topping. Desiccated coconut creates a sweeter truffle and raw cacao or matcha powder a decadent, slightly bitter truffle. You could also roll them in freeze dried fruit powders or finely chopped nuts, ferrero rocher styles. Get creative and let me know your favourite combinations in the comments below… Enjoy!

 

Nutty Chocolate Truffles

 

Nutty Chocolate Truffles

Makes: approximately 40
Prep time: 30 minute Chill time: 1 hour

1 cup brazil nuts, macadamia or cashews*
1 cup almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts*
1/2 cup nut butter or tahini
1/2 cup raw cacao powder
1/4 cup coconut oil, gently melted
2 Tbsp rice syrup
pinch Himalayan pink salt

Coatings
Desiccated coconut
Raw cacao powder
Freeze dried fruit powders
Matcha powder
Chopped nuts

Gently melt the coconut oil by placing into a heat proof bowl set over a pan of steaming water with the heat turned off. This ensures it isn’t heated above 46ºC and remains in it’s raw, nutritious state.

Place your combination of raw nuts into a food processor and blend until you have chunky crumbs. Add the rest of the ingredients, including the melted coconut oil, and blend until the mixture is well combined and comes together.

Roll teaspoonful’s of the mixture into small balls. If your kitchen is quite warm place them into the fridge to chill for 10 minutes or so before rolling in the coatings. This sets the coconut oil and allows the coatings to stick better.

Place your coating of choice into a small bowl and roll the chocolate truffles until evenly covered. Store the nutty chocolate truffles in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 weeks, or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

*to make these truffles even more nutritious, you can activate and dehydrate the nuts beforehand. This denatures the enzyme inhibitors in the nuts outer coating, which in turn makes the nutrients more bioavailable and easier to digest. To activate nuts soak them in filtered water using the guide times below, then either place them in a dehydrator set at 46ºC for 2 days or into an oven set on the lowest setting with the door slightly ajar. The nuts are ready when they’re completely dried through and crunchy.

Nut soak time guide:
cashew nuts 2-4 hours
almonds 10-12 hours
hazelnuts 4-6 hours
walnuts 4-6 hours
macadamia nuts 8-12 hours
pecans 4-6 hours
brazil nuts 8-12 hours

Nutty Chocolate Truffles